Carr Junior School

Welcome

A Welcome from our Head Teacher - Miss Ryder Welcome to Carr Junior School: a wonderful, vibrant school in the West of York. There are many special things about our school; however, without a doubt, the people are the stars of our school.

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Carr Junior School

Science

Every year at Carr Junior School we have a Science Day. During Science Day, the children get the opportunity to take part in 4 different Science based activities throughout the day. 

Super Science at Carr Junior School

In Science at Carr Junior, we cover a wide range of topics which are taught alongside and incorporated with the objectives of Working Scientifically. Outlined below are the objectives that the children will cover throughout each year.

 

Working Scientifically

During years 3 and 4, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them
  • setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests
  • making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers
  • gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions
  • recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables
  • reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions
  • using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions
  • identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes
  • using straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings

 

Working scientifically

During years 5 and 6, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • planning different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary
  • taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate
  • recording data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, scatter graphs, bar and line graphs
  • using test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests
  • reporting and presenting findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and a degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations
  • identifying scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments

 

Year 3 objectives

  • The pupil can name, locate and describe the functions of the main parts of plants, including those involved transporting water and nutrients.
  • The pupil can name, locate and describe the functions of the musculoskeletal systems in animals.
  • The pupil can group and identify materials, including rocks, in different ways according to their properties, based on first-hand observation; and justify the use of different everyday materials for different uses, based on their properties.
  • The pupil can describe how fossils are formed and provide evidence for evolution.
  • The pupil can use the idea that light comes from light sources.
  • The pupil can describe the effects of simple forces that involve contact and others that act at a distance (magnetic forces, including those between like and unlike magnetic poles).

 

Year 4 objectives

  • The pupil can use the observable features of plants, animals and micro-organisms to group, classify and identify them into broad groups.
  • The pupil can construct and interpret food chains.
  • The pupil can explain how environmental changes may have an impact on living things.
  • The pupil can name, locate and describe the functions of the main parts of the digestive system.
  • The pupil can describe the characteristics of different states of matter and group materials on this basis.
  • The pupil can use the idea that sounds are associated with vibrations, and that they require a medium to travel through, to explain how sounds are made and heard.
  • The pupil can describe the relationship between the pitch of a sound and the features of its source; and between the volume of a sound, the strength of the vibrations and the distance from its source.
  • The pupil can use simple apparatus to construct a series circuit, and describe how the circuit may be affected when changes are made to it.

 

Year 5 objectives

  • The pupil can name, locate and describe the functions of the main parts of plants involved in reproduction.
  • The pupil can describe and compare different reproductive processes and life cycles in animals.
  • The pupil can use the idea that light from light sources, or reflected light, travels in straight lines and enters our eyes to explain how we see objects, and the formation, shape and size of shadows.
  • The pupil can describe how materials change state at different temperatures, using this to explain everyday phenomena, including the water cycle.
  • The pupil can identify, and describe what happens when dissolving occurs in everyday situations; and describe how to separate mixtures and solutions into their components.
  • The pupil can identify, with reasons, whether changes in materials are reversible or not.
  • The pupil can describe the shapes and relative movements of the sun, moon, earth and other planets in the solar system; and explain the apparent movement of the sun across the sky in terms of the earth’s rotation and that this results in day and night.

 

Year 6 objectives 

  • The pupil can name, locate and describe the functions of the circulatory systems.
  • The pupil can describe the effects of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on how their bodies function.
  • The pupil can use the basic ideas of inheritance, variation and adaptation to describe how living things have changed over time and evolved and provide evidence for evolution.
  • The pupil can use the observable features of plants, animals and micro-organisms to classify and identify using keys or in other ways.
  • The pupil can describe the effects of simple forces that involve contact (air and water resistance, friction), and others that act at a distance such as gravity.
  • The pupil can identify simple mechanisms, including levers, gears and pulleys that increase the effect of a force.
  • The pupil can use recognised symbols to represent simple series circuit diagrams.
  • The pupil can use simple apparatus to control a series circuit.
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